Orange Bubble Necklace

Orange Bubble Necklace

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Starting Bid: $1.00

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$42.00
Winning: Danielle Jackson

Auction Closed

Ending On: March 25, 2013 12:00 am

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I don't know much about March Madness, but I do know that you Cowboy fans sure love orange! In honor of the Cowboys game today, bid on this cute bubble necklace. Be the most fashionable cowgirl at the next Oklahoma State sporting event.

Even if you aren't an OSU fan, this necklace is the perfect shade of orange for spring.

And for those of you who know my family, you know little Lydia will be sporting orange from time to time if my dad has anything to do with it.

Thank you so much for your bids. We appreciate your support as we work hard to give one girl her forever family. We are blessed.

This auction is now closed.

This auction is now closed.

  1. Danielle Jackson bid $42.00 on March 24, 2013 11:26 pm [auto]
  2. Eva Fast bid $41.00 on March 24, 2013 11:26 pm
  3. Danielle Jackson bid $38.00 on March 24, 2013 8:36 pm
  4. Eva Fast bid $36.00 on March 24, 2013 4:56 pm
  5. Crystal Abernathy bid $35.00 on March 24, 2013 4:53 pm [auto]
  6. Eva Fast bid $35.00 on March 24, 2013 4:53 pm
  7. Crystal Abernathy bid $31.00 on March 22, 2013 10:32 pm
  8. Eva Fast bid $30.00 on March 22, 2013 10:29 pm [auto]
  9. Crystal Abernathy bid $30.00 on March 22, 2013 10:29 pm
  10. Eva Fast bid $26.00 on March 22, 2013 10:27 pm [auto]
  11. Crystal Abernathy bid $25.00 on March 22, 2013 10:27 pm
  12. Eva Fast bid $20.50 on March 22, 2013 10:25 pm [auto]
  13. Crystal Abernathy bid $20.00 on March 22, 2013 10:25 pm
  14. Eva Fast bid $15.50 on March 22, 2013 10:23 pm [auto]
  15. Crystal Abernathy bid $15.00 on March 22, 2013 10:23 pm
  16. Eva Fast bid $1.00 on March 21, 2013 9:14 pm

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Shipping Details

Shipping: $5.00

From: Arkansas

To: United States

Payment Details

Winner will receive PayPal payment link via email.

Golden Yellow Necklace

Golden Yellow Necklace

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Starting Bid: $1.00

Refresh BidGoing for
$22.50
Winning: Danielle Jackson

Auction Closed

Ending On: March 24, 2013 1:00 am

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Bid on this beautiful golden yellow necklace.  It is so cute!

It's not every day that you get to buy something cute and help one little girl get a forever family.

Proceeds will help us make our next adoption payment of $2,000.

This auction is now closed.

This auction is now closed.

  1. Danielle Jackson bid $22.50 on March 21, 2013 2:43 pm
  2. Sarah Driscoll bid $20.50 on March 19, 2013 2:20 pm
  3. Jen Moore bid $20.00 on March 19, 2013 2:13 pm [auto]
  4. Sarah Driscoll bid $20.00 on March 19, 2013 2:13 pm
  5. Jen Moore bid $15.50 on March 19, 2013 1:45 pm [auto]
  6. Jenni bid $15.00 on March 19, 2013 1:45 pm
  7. Jen Moore bid $10.50 on March 19, 2013 1:36 pm [auto]
  8. Melissa M bid $10.00 on March 19, 2013 1:36 pm
  9. Jen Moore bid $1.00 on March 19, 2013 1:29 pm

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Shipping Details

Shipping: $5.00

From: Arkansas

To: USA

Payment Details

Winner will receive PayPal payment link via email.

Control

In our culture, we often believe we make our own destiny–we just have to work harder and believe–and then it will happen.

Whatta lie.

For the year or so that the pregnancy tests said “negative,” I wondered about what else I could possibly do to get pregnant.  Even when I finally told people that I was in fact infertile, I received many, many emails telling me about the latest stuff to cure infertility (weird stuff, stuff I had already tried! ha!).  We like the idea that we are in control–that we are like mini-gods altering the tough stuff that happens.

Whatta lie.

When tragedy strikes–such as the tragedy in Newtown, CT–we look for the reasons why.  We like to tell ourselves that if we know the reasons, then we can prevent more tragedies.  We do this, I think, to protect ourselves from the reality that there is very little that is in our own hands.  That is a scary realization.

For example, when we tell someone a friend was diagnosed with lung cancer, the first question is, “Well, did he smoke?” No, no he did not.  “Well, does it run in his family?” No, no it does not.  Suddenly, we are left with this fear that this could happen to us.  We want to hear that he smoked, because then we feel safer.  But, we aren’t safe from tragedies.

We are not fully in control of our futures.

If there is anything I have been learning during the past year and a half is that there is very little stuff in my hands on this journey.

People ask when we will get to meet our little one.  The answer is that we don’t know.

People ask how old she’ll be.  The answer is that we don’t know.

People ask which region she’ll be from.  The answer is that we don’t know.

People ask what her medical need will be.  The answer is that we don’t know.  (And honestly, to respect her privacy, I probably won’t post it online when I do know).

There are good lessons when we learn that we aren’t in control.

I am thankful I’ve been learning to truly walk by faith.  I think God is telling me, “M, I got this.  Just trust Me.”  It doesn’t mean the journey is easy.

Such good and hard lessons.

The Every Day Thoughts

“Making the decision to have a child — it’s momentous. It is to decide forever to have your heart go walking around outside your body.” – Elizabeth Stone

In every way imaginable, I believe that Elizabeth Stone’s quote applies to the decision to adopt a child as well.  The decision to love a child and raise a child is a life changing decision.  For most adults, you know that when you decide to love someone, especially a child, you are forever changed.

During the past several months, B and I have been doing everything in our might to educate ourselves about adoption, bonding, attachment, and parenting kiddos from hard places.  One of the things that we have really learned is that our child will likely experience more trauma in the first year of life than we have our entire lives.

Books detail some of these experiences.

I’ll never forget sitting on a flight late last fall — I was traveling somewhere for work.  I was reading about some of the experiences that babies and kiddos have who are orphans.  It is one thing to read about this — and it is quite another thing to know that there is this little person on the other side of the planet probably experiencing many of these things that no child should ever have to endure — and someday soon, that little person will be in your care.  THAT, that right there changes you in the everyday.  It changes the way I love people.  It changes the stuff I buy–and if I even buy stuff.  It changes the way I pray.  It changes the way I give–and what I give to.  It changes the way I respond to people.  It makes me reflect on my life and what I really value.  It changes what I value–or makes it clear.  It makes me mad–mad at how broken this world is–it is so freaking broken.  It makes me aware of how seriously small my world was–and selfish.  It makes me wonder, “Am I teaching the stuff that really matters?”  And when I complain about being hungry, it makes me realize that I’ve never really known what it feels like to be hungry–I mean every single day.  This decision, this education, this little person changes everything.

Yesterday was so cold, the wind was cutting–the kind of wind that makes you scrunch up and hide your face because it hurts.  The relief I felt when I jumped into my car and felt the comfort of my heated seats (heated seats that I once considered a “necessity”).  I quickly grab my iPhone to scan the news.  “Posts online by orphanage employee indicate several children freeze to death.”  My heart sinks.  This report coming out of the country we are adopting from.

Every single day, my heart and mind jerk back and forth between two worlds.  My heart is walking outside of my body.

Making the decision to adopt has forever changed us.

Often, people tell us how lucky our child will be to get us as parents.

No, you’ve got it wrong–TOTALLY wrong–we are the ones who feel so honored and blessed by the opportunity to parent.  What an education we have received.

 

 

 

Final Homestudy Visit

Today was our last home study visit with our social worker.  If everything goes according to the current time projections, the next time we will see our social worker in person, will be when B and I are introducing our little one to our family and friends at the airport in 2014 (hopefully not 2015).  THAT is AMAZING and so EXCITING.

The most common question we get is, “Okay, so now what?”

Well, now we wait. Wait for what?  Our social worker with the home study agency has to write up our home study report.  This will likely take one month.  Then, the report will go to our social worker at our adoption agency to review.

Once this is finished, we will send our home study report with an I800 A application to the USCIS.  They will review it and send us an appointment date to go to Ft. Smith for a biometrics appointment (fingerprints).  During this time, B and I will be collecting documents for our dossier.  Once we receive 1800 A Approval (this could range from 2-3 months), all of our documents will be authenticated at the county and state level.  Then, these will go to the Ch!nese Consulate in Houston to be authenticated. Then, all of this will come back to us and our agency.  Then, the dossier goes to Ch!na.

I think because people are most familiar with a pregnancy, people have asked me my due date.  Ha!  That’s not how this works.  There are so many variables outside our control that we have no idea.  We are hoping and praying that we will travel and adopt in March-April 2014.  When your heart feels like it is expecting, this is a long time to wait.

And then there are many more steps that I don’t quite understand.

So how are we doing in the wait?

Although I am not experiencing physical changes like a mom expecting a biological child, I feel real and profound changes in my heart.  That may sound weird, but one of my friends who has adopted and had bio kids said the same thing.

We are doing everything we can to educate ourselves on bonding and attachment. We’ve completed 28 of the 30 hours of  training required by our agency. The training has been great and so helpful in understanding how neglect early in life will affect our child and how we can help her transition and thrive.